The Honest Placebo

There is something very empowering about the placebo effect and the idea that we can heal ourselves. For decades, we've known about the placebo effect, but we've been unable to use it ethically in healthcare. One of the primary obstacles to using placebos in healthcare, was informed consent. It was thought that placebos necessarily required deception - the patient had to believe it would work. However, renowned placebo researcher - Ted Kaptchuk - realised that no one had ever put that theory to the test. So he began a research programme into identifying if people could respond to placebos even if they knew they were taking placebos. The results have changed how we think about placebos in healthcare.

A Room with a View – The placebo effect and architecture

In 1983, a groundbreaking study was published demonstrating that architectural environment influences recovery from surgery. Benedetti described the placebo as "the whole ritual of the therapeutic act", so why shouldn't that also include the clinical environment? In this article, we explore the 1983 study and the implications of this in global health.

The Architecture of Happiness

Alain de Botton's "The Architecture of Happiness" was one of the books that first got me thinking about how buildings can physically affect us. At Yekize, we believe that the placebo effect, is not just about what you take, but also about other factors such as the doctor-patient relationship and the clinical setting - so why not take architecture into consideration as well?

“Great architecture can heal”

In 2016, Michael Murphy did one of my all time favourite TED Talks. It's entitled 'Architecture that's built to heal' and he discusses architecture as a means for physical, emotional and societal healing. His inspiring talk made me feel that this is something we should make more of. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvXZzKZ3JYQ Getting inspired Michael Murphy was inspired to action … Continue reading “Great architecture can heal”